Herbs

herbs gallery

DIABETIC GUARD

Uses: 
This is a blend of certified documented herbs for * treatment and cure of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. * It rejuvenates pancreatic cells and enhances natural insulin secretion. * Helps in sugar assimilation * Neutralises excess sugar and balances hyper and hypoglycemia * Reverses complications associated with diabetes.
Definition/Short Discription: 

Herbal Medicine for Diabetes.

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By superuser on 20 August 2012

Nettle

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Aloe arborescens Leaf

Uses: 
Aloe arborescens (not to be confused with aloe vera) has been shown to shrink cancerous tumors—and has clinical proof of efficacy in treating AIDS? Aloe arborescens is like the often-overlooked sibling to the more popular aloe vera, a medicinal plant widely used to treat skin ailments such as sunburns, cuts, scrapes and rashes. Deserving of much more acclaim, Aloe arborescens contains none of the usual underdog characteristics, as it is proven to be a more effective anti-cancer agent and immune booster than aloe vera. Studies conducted by the Palatinin Salzano Institute in Italy indicate that aloe arborescens is 200% more abundant in curative nutrients and 75% richer in anti-cancer compounds than aloe vera is. The Health-giving Ingredients of the Aloe Plant Aloe plants are among the world's most biologically active plants, meaning they feed our cells with living nutrients. Cut an aloe leaf open and you will see a thick gel-like substance that is made up of 99% water and only 1% aloe juice. Within that 1% aloe juice, however, are over 200 active plant compounds, such as phytonutrients, enzymes, proteins, oils, polysaccharides and monosaccharides, as well as 12 essential vitamins, 20 key minerals and 18 vital amino acids. The antioxidant and restorative effects of aloe administer many benefits, such as inhibiting the growth of tumor cells, detoxifying and oxygenating your blood, and much more!
Usage: 
Aloe as an Anti-Cancer Agent Physicians and clinics around the world have implemented aloe arborescens as a cancer cure for many years now. After witnessing dozens of patients diagnosed with untreatable cancer enter remission after drinking a potent tonic of aloe arborescens, the Brazilian priest, Father Romano Zago, spent 20 years researching the science behind the herb. Collecting more than 40 corroborative stories, Zago reported his findings in the popular book, Cancer be Cured! One story tells how a man suffering from prostate cancer was brought back from the brink of death by drinking this aloe concentrate. He was released from the hospital, his massive tumor virtually disappeared, and he lived a long life well into his 80s. Alternative health expert, Dr. Julian Whitaker, recounts a similar story, explaining how a 10-year-old boy with a rare brain tumor enjoyed a cancer-free life full of normal activities after drinking 8 ounces of whole leaf aloe vera concentrate every day for 3 months. The medical community has categorized aloe arborescens as a Stage IV supplemental treatment, proven to enhance the efficacy of chemo agents cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). A 2009 study consisting of 240 patients revealed that chemotherapy patients who ingested an extract of aloe arborescens daily showed significantly greater improvement than patients who underwent chemotherapy alone. Researchers concluded that aloe arborescens complements the effects of chemotherapy by slowing down tumor growth and increasing survival time. Acemannan, a sugar compound present in aloe, both boosts cell communication and stimulates the immune system. It stimulates nitric oxide, the immune system's weapon against cancer. Aloe arborescens also contains glycoproteins that have been shown to suppress the growth of fibrosarcoma tumors (tumors originating in the tissues of bones or muscles) in mice. The immune stimulating properties of aloe also render the herb a wonderful therapy for AIDS sufferers. One study found that nearly all of the AIDS patients who were administered aloe therapy experienced improved conditions due to a dramatic increase in their white T-cell count. Want Your Daily Dose of Aloe? Store bought aloe is typically not nutrient-dense, as the majority has been processed, heated and diluted. Beware: a label of 100% aloe juice may be false, as the government issues no legal ramifications against such a claim. If you want to benefit specifically from aloe arborescens, it is worthwhile to grow your own and take it fresh. You can also buy aloe tincture from us. Aloe tincture is prepared by cutting fresh aloe into small pieces and soaking them in 70% absolute ethanol in amber bottle (to prevent ultra violet light from destroying the active compounds). The mixture is then left to stand for two weeks for the whole active compounds to dissolve fully into the ethanol. The ethanol should be 70% and the other 30% is water. This is important since some compounds in aloe will dissolve in ethanol and others will dissolve in water. This makes sure all the active compounds will be extracted from The Aloe. Ethanol is also a natural preservative and this mixture can be used for long time of up to 3 years.
Definition/Short Discription: 

Aloe arborescens is like the often-overlooked sibling to the more popular aloe vera

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Warbugia Ugandensis

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Senna Occidentalis( diabetic herb )

Uses: 
In traditional practice, Senna Occidentalis medicinal plant is used in many countries to control diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder resulting from insulin deficiency, characterized by hyperglycemia, altered metabolism of carbohydrates, protein and lipids, and an increased risk of vascular complication. Diabetes mellitus has recently been identified by Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) as one of the refractory diseases for which satisfactory treatment is not available in modern allopathic system of medicine.. A large number of plant preparations have been reported to possess antidiabetic activity over the last several decades. Researchers in India have documented the use of over 150 plants in various families with hypoglycemic activity. Cassia occidentalis Linn. (COL) Family Caesalpiniaceae is a common weed scattered from the foothills of Himalayas to West Bengal, South India, Burma, and Sri Lanka and Africa. The plant is a diffuse (usually annual) under shrub with loosely spreading branches 60–150 cm long, found throughout India and Africa, up to an altitude of 1500 m.[6] Different parts of this plant have been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, antihepatotoxic, antibacterial and antiplasmodial activities. They possess purgative, tonic, febrifugal, expectorant and diuretic properties. The plant is also used to cure sore eyes, hematuria, rheumatism, typhoid, asthma and disorder of hemoglobin and is also reported to cure leprosy. An infusion of the bark is given in diabetes. A wide range of chemical constituents isolated from C. occidentalis including sennoside, anthraquinone glycoside, fatty oils, flavonoids, glycosides, gallactomannan, polysaccharides and tannins. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of ethanolic extract of C. occidentalis (COL) on fasting blood sugar levels and biochemical parameters such as serum cholesterol, total protein and triglyceride. Histologic examination was also carried out on hematoxylin-eosin stained sections of pancreatic tissue.
Usage: 
It can be concluded that ethanolic extract of S. occidentalis exhibited significant antidiabetic activity in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The extract also resulted in improvement in parameters like body weight and lipid profile as well as regeneration of β-cells of pancreas and so it valuable in the treatment of diabetes.
Definition/Short Discription: 

Senna Occidentalis.

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Prunus Africa

Definition/Short Discription: 

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Cassia Herb

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Cactus

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Amaranth

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Acacia Nilotica

Uses: 
Medicinal Use: 1. Burns 2. Wounds 3. Anaemia 4. Stained teeth 5. Blood dysentery 6. Gum diseases, loose teeth, and ulcers in the mouth 7. Cough 8. Eczema. 9. Cough, diabetes, excessive urination, impotency, and throat infection 10. Conjunctivitis and sore eyes
Usage: 
How to Use: 1. To take care of burns, mix the gum that oozes from the tree with equal quantities of powdered turmeric (Curcuma domestica) and coconut oil (Cocos nucifera) and apply. 2. For superficial wounds, boil some crushed bark in water and use the decoction for washing the wounds. Grind the tender leaves of the tree into a very fine paste. Apply over the wounds. You could also dust the wounds with some finely powdered bark. 3. For cases of anaemia, fry one teaspoon each of the gum from the tree along with sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) and purslane (Portulaca oleracea) in an adequate quantity of olive oil or gingilee oil for 10 minutes. Remove and soak in 1-cup of rose-water for one hour. Use one teaspoon three times a day. 4. To remove the yellow stains from your teeth, grind the following items into a fine powder and brush the teeth regularly with it: 5-7 tablespoons of the charred bark of Acacia, two tablespoons of Aluminum sulfate or Alum and one tablespoon of Sodium chloride or common salt. 5. For dysentery, soak a teaspoon of pounded roots in a tumbler containing water for 3-4 hours. Make it warm and drink this water frequently. 6. To take care of gum diseases, loose teeth, and ulcers in the mouth, boil half a handful of the tender leaves of Acacia in two cups of water. When warm, use the water as a gargle, 4-6 times a day. 7. For common cough, make a paste with a handful of the tender leaves of Acacia, take one teaspoon of this paste, along with one teaspoon of honey and a little warm water. 8. To treat Eczema, boil 3-5 tablespoons each of the powdered bark of Acacia and Mango (Mangifra indica) in 4-5 cups of water. Foment the affected parts with this water. Apply rarefied butter or ghee on the affected skin. 9. For Cough, Diabetes, Excessive urination, Impotency, and Throat infection, chew a small portion of the Acacia gum everyday until the ailment disappears. 10. To treat Conjunctivitis and sore eyes, grind a handful of the tender leaves of Acacia with some water into a fine paste. Fold the paste in a sterilized piece of cloth or bandage and wrap it over the closed eyes at bedtime. Parts Used: Bark, gum, tender leaves, and root. Dosage: As recommended above.
Definition/Short Discription: 

The Acacia or Babul Tree is an average size tree that is common to India and Africa. It is quite easily distinguishable by the dark brown or black, longitudinally fissured bark. It belongs to the plant family, Mimosaceae. The leaves are bipinnately compound and 5-10 cm. long. The plant has a good defensive mechanism in its V-shaped thorns that are white or light gray in color. The globose flowers are yellow and the pods are light gray in color. The pods, 7.5-15 cm. long are compressed and constricted at the sutures between the seeds, which range from 8-12 in a single pod.

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By Client on 16 June 2011

Aloe-vera

Uses: 
Used to treat malaria, Fever, Cough and Asthma.
Usage: 
Boil for 15-20 minutes, then drink one cup 3 times daily until your finally filling well. Go medical check-up if symptom persists.
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By Client on 04 May 2011

Kigelia African

Uses: 
Kigelia Africana Fruit - improves firmness and elasticity of the skin Introduction In Africa, KIGELIA AFRICANA is a sacred tree of which fruit brings wealth. The Lebou of Green Cap matrons frequently use the pulp of the ripe fruits as decocte per os and as friction on the young women breast in order to endow them as a well-developed bust. They say that the menstruations before and after the treatment obviously show the validity of this therapeutic. Other parts of the tree (bark, roots) are used in traditional medicine. Barks are employed in whole treatment of epileptic states and recommended in some antileprous preparations. Roots could be used in sterility treatments. Origin Kigelia is mainly localized in Senegal, in seaboard Casamance and in coastal wet areas. It is rare inland, where it is in some forested galleries. Botanical Description Kigelia Africana, from the Bignoniaceae family, is a bole tree, with tortuous branches. It can reach 10 m to 15 m high. Its leaves are more or less glabrous, tough, and crunchy, with 3 or 4 pairs of entire or lightly dentate folioles. The characteristic fruits are cylindrical, woody of 30-35 cm, rounded at the two extremities, polished, and contain many seeds. Traditional Applications Kigelia has a long history of use by rural African communities, particularly for its medicinal properties. Most commonly, traditional healers have used the sausage tree to treat a wide range of skin ailments, from fungal infections, boils, psoriasis and eczema, through to the more serious diseases, such as leprosy, syphilis and skin cancer. It also has internal applications, including the treatment of dysentery, ringworm, tapeworm, post-partum haemorrhaging, malaria, diabetes, pneumonia and toothache. The Tonga women of the Zambezi valley regularly apply cosmetic preparations of Kigelia fruit to their faces to ensure a blemish-free complexion. The fruit is a common ingredient in traditional beer, and is said to hasten the fermentation process. Kigelia leaves are an important livestock fodder, and the fruits are much prized by monkeys and elephants. Perhaps not surprisingly, given its suggestive shape, the fruit has also found traditional use as an aphrodisiac. Known Properties A significant body of scientific literature and patents confirm the validity of many of the traditional uses of Kigelia and suggest a number of new applications. Several papers support the use of Kigelia fruit extract for treating skin cancer, whilst it has also found a market in Europe and the Far East as the active ingredient in skin tightening and breast firming formulations. Kigelia's known chemical constituents include: Napthaquinones (including kigelinone) Fatty acids (including vernolic) Courmarins (including kigelin) Iridoids Caffeic acid Norviburtinal Sterols (including sitosterol and stigmasterol) The steroids are known to help a range of skin conditions, notably eczema, and the flavonoids have clear hygroscopic and fungicidal properties. Strong anecdotal evidence suggests that it is effective in the treatment of solar keratosis, skin cancer and Kaposi sarcoma, an HIV-related skin ailment. New research by PhytoTrade Africa has supported anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Clinical Studies The tested product is a gel of Carbopol containing 5% of Kigelia Fruit Extract. The product is applied once a day with a prolonged massage, covering the whole bust area and the neck during 4 weeks. The 10 volunteers are between 30 and 45 year old women, with at least one pregnancy, and a breast measurement less than 90 cm. The opening angle shows the improvement of the curve position and raising up of the bosom and decreasing in the photo. BUST FIRMNESS IMPROVEMENT = 50 % CUTANEOUS FIRMNESS IMPROVEMENT = 55 % CUTANEOUS ELASTICITY IMPROVEMENT = 70 % GENERAL IMPRESSION ABOUT Kigelia is MORE THAN 50% SATISFIED WOMEN Conclusion Due to its exceptional firming properties, Kigelia helps improve firmness and elasticity of the skin and breasts.
Definition/Short Discription: 

In Africa, KIGELIA AFRICANA is a sacred tree of which fruit brings wealth. The Lebou of Green Cap matrons frequently use the pulp of the ripe fruits as decocte per os and as friction on the young women breast in order to endow them as a well-developed bust. They say that the menstruations before and after the treatment obviously show the validity of this therapeutic. Other parts of the tree (bark, roots) are used in traditional medicine. Barks are employed in whole treatment of epileptic states and recommended in some antileprous preparations. Roots could be used in sterility treatments.

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By Client on 04 May 2011

neem-tree leaves

Uses: 
Neem is known for its immeasurable medicinal properties and is used as a main ingredient in many home remedies. Commending the medicinal properties of neem, numerous sanskrit names have been coined by our ayurveda acharyas . Few of them are mentioned below. 1. It is known as Nimba as it boosts health 2. It is praised as Pichumarda as it destroys skin diseases.
Usage: 
Chemical composition of neem: Neem tree has numerous medicinal properties by virtue of its chemical compounds. Seeds of the Neem tree contain the highest concentration of Azadirachtin. Apart from Azadirachtin , salannin, gedunin, azadirone, nimbin, nimbidine, nimbicidine, nimbinol, etc are other important liminoids of neem. Uses of neem in horticulture: Neem has been the most traditionally used plant in India , Pakistan and Africa to protect grains and cereals from pests. Fresh neem leaves are mixed with grains and creals before storing. A paste of fresh neem leaves is rubbed against the wall of large mud bins or gunny bags in which the grains and cereals are stored. Some times a thick layer of dry neem leaves are spread over grains. Neem oil extracted from seeds acts as best biopesticide. Jute sacks treated with neem oil or extracts of neem are used to store food grains. Neem oil is a very cheap and effective house hold pesticide to protect grains and legumes from pests. Neem is being used to protect stored roots and tubers from potato moth. Azadirachtin is available in high concentration in neem seeds. It is used as “botanical pesticide” which is environmentally friendly. It prevents insects from feeding on plants and regulates the growth of insects. Neem extracts do not harm the insects like bees, spiders and butterflies which help in pollination. Medicinal properties of Neem: The Neem tree has many medicinal uses. The chemical compounds present in neem have anti-inflammatory , antiarthritic ,antipyretic ,hypoglycaemic , Antifungal, spermicidal, antimalarial, antibacterial and Diuretic properties. Flower, leaves, bark and seeds of neem are used in home remedies and in preparation of medicines. Bark of neem acts as antipyretic and helps to reduce fever. Flowers are used in intestinal disorders. Juice from fresh leaves is very helpful in treating skin diseases, wounds and obesity. Oil from neem seeds is used in arthritis, skin diseases and muscular sprains. Neem is very effective in treating gum diseases. The neem is proved to be beneficial in treating skin diseases because of its antibiotic, antifungal and blood purifying properties. According to ayurveda principles vitiated Kapha and pitta cause skin diseases. Neem pacifies vitiated kapha and pitta, thus helps to cure skin ailments. It promotes wound healing as it is antibacterial and astringent. In psoriasis it reduces itching, irritation, roughness of skin and heals the psoriatic patches. In same way it heals eczema too. It reduces infection and inflammation of acne. Neem helps to maintain the health of scalp skin and prevents dandruff. Due to its detoxifying properties it helps to keep organ systems healthy, especially circulatory, digestive, respiratory and urinary systems. Scientific studies have revealed that neem reduces blood sugar level. Hence its usage supports diabetic patients to keep their blood sugar level in control. Diabetes impairs blood circulation and causes gangrene in lower extremities. Numerous scientific researches have highlightened the role of neem in keeping circulatory system healthy, thus reducing the chances of gangrene. Recent studies have shown that neem reduces blood cholesterol level and keeps the heart healthy. Home remedies with neem 1. Apply Crushed fresh leaves of neem on acne. In case of body acne mix fine paste of fresh neem leaves in little water and smear this mixture on back, chest and shoulders. 2. In itching, application of neeem oil on affected areas helps. Boil neem leaves in a big bowl of water and mix this in bathing water. This reduces body itch. 3. Massaging neem oil to scalp removes head lice and prevents formation of dandruff. 4. Mix dry neem powder, shikakai and amla in water and apply this as pack on head . This pack has to be kept for 45 minutes and washed off later. This prevents hairloss and dandruff. Fresh neem leaves can also be used instead of dry neem powder. 5. A freshly prepared paste of turmeric, neem and sesame seeds is recommended in ayurveda for fungal infection between toes. 6. Fumigating the house with smoke of dried neem leaves in evenings for 1-2 minutes is an excellent ayurvedic method to keep mosquitoes away. Neem in House hold Neem flower pachidi is prepared from roasted neem flower and is a famous dish in South India which is prepared during ugadi. Neem flower rasam improves digestion and is very popular in Andhra and Tamilnadu. Extract of skin friendly neem is being used in manufacturing bathing soaps, hair gels, body lotions etc. These products are gaining popularity in market.
Definition/Short Discription: 

Latin Names :Azadirachta indica A. Juss.

English Name / Common Name : Neem

Sanskrit / Indian Name : Nimba

Swahili / East Africa : Mwarubaine.

Neem (Azadirachta indica) belongs to the mahogany family tree. In India, it in fact is called the "Heal All" or "Divine Tree". Neem is really very useful from roots to leaves. It is also said to cure more than 40 different diseases hence its Swahili name ( mwarubaine) . The neem fruit that produce neem oil which is the main player and commonly used. It's very useful in diverse ways such as skin care and acne treatment.

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By Client on 04 May 2011

Black walnut tincture.

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By Client on 04 May 2011

Carissa Edulis, Magic herb! (Loliondo)

Uses: 
Used to treat malaria, Typhoid Fever, Cough, Asthma, fibroids, arthritis, low immunity, cancer, Allergies, Blood pressure, Stroke, Tumor, Syphilis, Infertility, herpes simplex and vivax, vaginal candidiasis, diabetes. ETC The ‘magic herb’ that has made thousands of people flock to remote Loliondo village in Tanzania was identified by Kenyan scientists four years ago as a cure for a drug-resistant strain of a sexually transmitted disease. An expert on herbal medicine also said yesterday the herb is one of the most common traditional cures for many diseases. It is known as mtandamboo in Kiswahili and it has been used for the treatment of gonorrhoea among the Maasai, Samburu and Kikuyu. The Kamba refer to it as mukawa or mutote and use it for chest pains, while the Nandi boil the leaves and bark to treat breast cancer, headache and chest pains. Four years ago, local researchers turned to the plant for the treatment of a virus that causes herpes. Led by Dr Festus M Tolo of the Kenya Medical Research Institute (Kemri), the team from the University of Nairobi and the National Museums of Kenya found the herb could provide alternative remedy for herpes infections. “An extract preparation from the roots of Carissa edulis, a medicinal plant locally growing in Kenya, has exhibited remarkable anti-herpes virus activity for both wild type and drug resistant strains,” they reported in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology. No negative effects “The mortality rate for mice treated with extract was also significantly reduced by between 70 and 90 per cent as compared with the infected untreated mice that exhibited 100 per cent mortality.” The researchers reported that the extract did not have any negative effects on the mice. Mrs Grace Ngugi, head of economic ethnobotany at the National Museums of Kenya, said the plant was not poisonous as feared earlier. Further studies have shown the plant to contain ingredients that make it a good diuretic. Diuretics are drugs used to increase the frequency of urination to remove excess fluid in the body, a condition that comes with medical conditions such as congestive heart failure, liver and kidney disease. Some diuretics are also used for the treatment of high blood pressure. These drugs act on the kidneys to increase urine output, reducing the amount of fluid in the blood, which in turn lowers blood pressure. A study at the Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia found the herb was a powerful diuretic. It is found in many parts of the country and is used to treat headache, rheumatism, gonorrhoea, syphilis and rabies, among other diseases. The Ethiopians tested its potency on mice and found it increased the frequency of urination. This was more so when an extract from the bark of the root was used. “These findings support the traditional use of Carissa spp. as a diuretic agent,” write the researchers in theJournal of Alternative Medicine. The Kemri study also isolated other compounds from the herb, including oleuropein, an immune booster, and lupeol. Lupeol, according to researchers from the University of Wisconsin, US, was found to act against cancerous cells in mice. “We showed that lupeol possesses antitumor-promoting effects in a mouse and should be evaluated further,” wrote Dr Mohammad Saleem, a dermatologist. Mrs Ngugi said the herb was one of the most prevalent traditional cures and herbalists harvest roots, barks and even the fruits to make concoctions for many diseases. “Among the Mbeere and Tharaka people where the fruit is called ngawa, the plant is used for the treatment of malaria. The fruits, when ripe, are eaten by both children and adults,” she said.
Usage: 
Boil fine root powder for 2 minutes with 2 and halve glasses of water let it cool down and sieve, then drink one cup 2 times daily until your finally filling well. You may also add in hot tea or coffee and stir for 5 minutes and take. Go for laboratory check up regularly. Treatment depends with type of disease. For most diseases take for two weeks. For chronic disease like cancer, tumors, HIV/AIDS you may take up to six months.
Definition/Short Discription: 

The ‘magic herb’ that has made thousands of people flock to remote Loliondo village in Tanzania was identified by Kenyan scientists four years ago as a cure for a drug-resistant strain of a sexually transmitted disease.

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By Client on 03 May 2011